Susan Slaughter

Archive for the ‘Everything’ Category

SAS Global Forum 2018

In Everything, SAS, SAS Global Forum, SAS Papers on April 6, 2018 at 2:50 pm

I’m excited because in a couple days I will fly to Denver for SAS Global Forum 2018, the biggest SAS conference of the year, attended by thousands.

If you are coming, I hope you will attend the presentation that Lora Delwiche and I have.  It is “SAS Studio: A New Way to Program in SAS” on Wednesday April 11, 10:00-11:30am in Meeting Room506.

It’s a Hands On Workshop so it’s best if you can be there in person.  If you can’t, you can still read the paper.

In fact, you can access the proceedings for the entire conference.

Update 04/15/2018

SAS Global Forum 2018 is now over, but if you missed the live webcast, you still can see the Opening Session here. (The presentation starts about 12 minutes in.)

 

There is also a library of interesting videos available on demand.

 

A Little Advice: How to Be a Top SAS Programmer

In Everything, Little SAS Book Series, ODS Graphics, SAS on April 6, 2018 at 1:18 pm

Recently I was honored to be interviewed by Mamadou Dakouo for his company DataSteps.

 

I was asked three questions:

  • How did I learn SAS?
  • What advice do I have for someone who wants to become a “top SAS programmer?”
  • What is my favorite SAS procedure?

My answers were

  • In graduate school
  • Be a self-starter
  • PROC FORMAT (runner-up: PROC SGPLOT)

For the details you can watch the 6 minute video.

Computer says…my job is safe

In Detritus, Everything, Writing on January 12, 2018 at 11:04 am

The purpose of this blog is simply to post this link to an article in The Economist.

Click here to read the article “How soon will computers replace The Economist’s science writers?

At this point, I could stop writing because this article falls into the category of No Comment Needed, but that would be too easy.  As a conscientious blogger, I will add that while computers have clearly failed to master technical and scientific writing, they should have no trouble writing literary criticism.

WUSS 2017: The Papers

In Everything on September 15, 2017 at 4:23 pm

Western Users of SAS Software 2017 logoThe Western Users of SAS Software 2017 conference is coming to Long Beach, CA, September 20-22.  I have been to a lot of SAS conferences, but WUSS is always my favorite because it is big enough for me to learn a lot, but small enough to be really friendly.

If you come I hope you will catch my presentations.  If you want a preview or if you can’t come, click the links below to download the papers.

On Wednesday, I will once again present SAS Essentials, a whirlwind introduction to SAS programming in just three hours specially designed for people who are new to SAS.

How SAS Thinks: SAS Basics I

Introduction to DATA Step Programming: SAS Basics II

Introduction to SAS Procedures: SAS Basics III

Then on Friday Lora Delwiche will present a Hands-On Workshop about SAS Studio, a new SAS interface that runs in a web browser.

SAS Studio: A New Way to Program in SAS

I hope to see you there!

 

 

Choose Your SAS Interface

In Everything on September 15, 2017 at 3:53 pm

A while back, I wrote about the proliferation of interfaces for writing SAS programs.  I am reposting that blog here (with a few changes) because a lot of SAS users still don’t understand that they have a choice.

These days SAS programmers have more choices than ever before about how to run SAS.  They can use the old SAS windowing enviroment (often called Display Manager because, face it, SAS windowing environment is way too vague), or SAS Enterprise Guide, or the new kid on the block: SAS StudioAll of these are included with Base SAS.

DisplayManager9-4window

Display Manager / SAS Windowing Environment

EG7-12window

SAS Enterprise Guide

SASStudio3-5window

SAS Studio

I recently asked a SAS user, “Which interface do you use for SAS programming?”

She replied, “Interface?  I just install SAS and use it.”

“You’re using Display Manager,” I explained, but she had no idea what I was talking about.

Trust me.  This person is an extremely sophisticated SAS user who does a lot of leading-edge mathematical programming, but she didn’t realize that Display Manager is not SAS.  It is just an interface to SAS.

This is where old timers like me have an advantage.  If you can remember running SAS in batch, then you know that Display Manager, SAS Enterprise Guide, and SAS Studio are just interfaces to SAS–wonderful, manna from heaven–but still just interfaces.  They are optional.  It is possible to write SAS programs in an editor such as Word or Notepad++, and copy-and-paste into one of the interfaces or submit them in batch.  In fact, here is a great blog by Leonid Batkhan describing how to use your web browser as a SAS code editor.

Each of these interfaces has advantages and disadvantages.  I’m not going to list them all here, because this is a blog not an encyclopedia, but the tweet would be

“DM is the simplest, EG has projects, SS runs in browsers.”

I have heard rumors that SAS Institute is trying to develop an interface that combines the best features of all three.  So someday maybe one of these will displace the others, but at least for the near future, all three of these interfaces will continue to be used.

So what’s your SAS interface?

Introducing The Little SAS Enterprise Guide Book

In Everything on April 13, 2017 at 1:48 pm

Image of The Little SAS Enterprise Guide BookThere is a new member of The Little SAS Book family: The Little SAS Enterprise Guide Book.  This book is for people who use SAS Enterprise Guide as their interface.  EG is a point-and-click interface for SAS, but it’s great for programmers too.  And this book includes a new chapter covering the wonderful features for SAS programmers along with discussion of special issues that they face.

If you are familiar with our other EG books, you may be wondering why this one isn’t called the “Fourth Edition.”  That is because we changed the title slightly.  Our previous EG books were each written for a specific version of EG, and consequently had the version number right in the title.  This book was written using EG 7.1, but it also applies to some earlier versions (5.1 and 6.1).  With a little luck, this book will also apply to future versions.  So it’s a keeper.

I’m very pleased with how this book has turned out.  Lora Delwiche and I updated it so that all the windows and icons match the current EG, and we also added some great new sections.  Even with the new topics, this book is 60 pages shorter than our previous EG book!  It is shorter because we replaced some chapters on specific types of tasks, with a new chapter that explains how tasks work in general.  The result is a book that is easier to read and more useful.

For more information about this book including the table of contents, an excerpt, and reviews, click here.

What’s Your SAS Interface?

In Enterprise Guide, Everything, Little SAS Book Series, SAS on May 12, 2016 at 7:30 am

These days SAS programmers have more choices than ever before about how to run SAS.  They can use the old Display Manager interface, or SAS Enterprise Guide, or the new kid on the block: SAS StudioAll of these are included with Base SAS.

DisplayManager9-4window

Display Manager / SAS Windowing Environment

EG7-12window

SAS Enterprise Guide

SASStudio3-5window

SAS Studio

Once upon a time, the only choices were Display Manager (officially named the SAS windowing environment), or batch.  Then along came SAS Enterprise Guide.  (Ok, I know there were a few others, but I don’t count SAS/ASSIST which was rightly spurned by SAS users, or the Analyst application which was just a stopover on the highway to SAS Enterprise Guide.)

I recently asked a SAS user, “Which interface do you use for SAS programming?”

She replied, “Interface?  I just install SAS and use it.”

“You’re using Display Manager,” I explained, but she had no idea what I was talking about.

Trust me.  This person is an extremely sophisticated SAS user who does a lot of leading-edge mathematical programming, but she didn’t realize that Display Manager is not SAS.  It is just an interface to SAS.

This is where old timers like me have an advantage.  If you can remember running SAS in batch, then you know that Display Manager, SAS Enterprise Guide, and SAS Studio are just interfaces to SAS–wonderful, manna from heaven–but still just interfaces.  They are optional.  You could write SAS programs in Word or Notepad or some other editor, and submit them in batch–but why would you?  (I know someone is going to tell me that they do, in fact, do that, but the point is that it is not mainstream.  Only mega-nerds with the instincts of a true hacker do that these days.)

Each of these interfaces has advantages and disadvantages.  I’m not going to list them all here, because this is a blog not an encyclopedia, but the tweet would be

“DM is the simplest, EG has projects, SS runs in browsers.”

Personally, I think all of these interfaces are keepers.  At least for the near future, all three of these interfaces will continue to be used.  What we are seeing here is a proliferation of choices, not displacement of one with another.

So what’s your SAS interface?

 

Free Resources for Learning SAS (and Other Tips from SAS Authors)

In Everything, Publishing, SAS, SAS Global Forum, SAS Papers, Western Users of SAS Software on May 3, 2016 at 1:01 pm

In celebration of SAS Global Forum, the folks at SAS Press gathered tips from SAS Press authors.  Here is my contribution:

This is the best time ever to learn SAS!

When I first encountered SAS, there were only two ways that I could get help. I could either ask another graduate student who might or might not know the answer, or I could go to the computer center and borrow the SAS manual. (There was only one.) Today it’s totally different.  I am continually amazed by the resources that are available now—many for FREE

Here are four resources that every new SAS user should know about:

1. SAS Studio

This is a wonderful new interface for SAS that runs in a browser and has both programming and point-and-click features. SAS Studio is free for students, professors, and independent learners. You can download the SAS University Edition to run SAS Studio on your own computer, or use SAS OnDemand for Academics via the Internet.

2. Online classes

Two of the most popular self-paced e-learning classes are available for free: SAS Programming 1: Essentials, and Statistics 1. These are real classes which in the past people paid thousands of dollars to take.

3. Videos

You can access hundreds of SAS training videos, tutorials, and demos at support.sas.com/training/tutorial. Topics range from basic (What is SAS?) to advanced (SAS 9.4 Metadata Clustering).

4. Community of SAS users

If you encounter a problem, it is likely that someone else has faced a similar situation and figured out how to solve it. On communities.sas.com you can post questions and get answers from SAS users and developers. On the site, www.lexjansen.com, you can find virtually every paper ever presented at a SAS users group conference. The site www.sasCommunity.org is a wiki-style compendium of all things SAS.

For more tips from SAS Press authors, click here to read them all.

 

Missed SGF 2016? It’s not too late

In Everything, SAS, SAS Global Forum, SAS Papers on April 22, 2016 at 9:29 am

SASGlobalForum2016logo

 

SAS Global Forum 2016 is over.

Thousands of conference attendees are now back home.  Much of the conference was live-streamed, but if you missed it, that’s all right because many of the best sessions were recorded.  However, finding particular videos can be tricky.  So, here are my favorites.  Click the heading to link to the video:

Opening Session Highlights

Learn where SAS is now and where it’s going including cloud computing with SAS Viya in a short and sweet 5 minute summary.

Ariana Huffington on The Sleep Revolution

Huffington talks about the importance of a good night’s sleep for doing our best.  This is the full presentation.

David McCandless on Data Visualization

McCandless is an amazing graphic artist of data.  This is the full presentation.

Breakout Sessions

The heart of SAS Global Forum has always been papers by SAS users for SAS users.  This year more have been recorded than ever before.

 

A short history of The Little SAS Book

In Everything, Little SAS Book Series, Publishing, SAS on November 19, 2015 at 10:11 am

In celebration of SAS Press’ 25th anniversary, Lora Delwiche and I reminisced about what it was like writing the first edition of The Little SAS BookYou can read about it on The SAS Learning Post. LSB1_and_SAS_manual